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Getting Poor or No Signal on a Wireless Router due to Distance Related Problems

Keep in mind that wireless devices have limitations when it comes to their range. For devices running on 2.4 GHz, the range can go up to 100-150 feet. If your wireless network is too far from its range, consider relocating the devices. One important thing to remember is that distance is directly proportional to signal strength. The farther you are from the Access Point, the lower the signal. To check if you’re getting a stable connection, perform a continuous ping. If you’re getting replies most of the time, this means the connection is stable. If it times out majority of the time, the connection is not that stable. For instructions, click here to perform a continuous ping.

NOTE: If you’re using an SRX and/or SRX400 device, the range is thrice that of Wireless-G. If they are using SRX200 devices, the wireless range is twice that of Wireless-G. If the customer, on the other hand, is using a Wireless-N device, the wireless range is four times compared to Wireless-G.
 

 

 

How to perform a continuous ping

NOTE: This article assumes that the LAN IP address of the wireless router is 192.168.1.1. If you’ve changed the router’s IP address, that’s the IP address you’ll be pinging.

Click on the following operating systems to perform continuous ping:

Windows 98/ME
Windows 2000/XP
Windows Vista

Windows 98/ME

Step 1:
Click Start, then Run. A window similar to Step 2 will appear.

Step 2:
Once the Run window appears, type “command” in the Open field, then click OK.

Step 3:
When the MS DOS Prompt appears, type “ping 192.168.1.1 –t” or the IP address of the wireless router then press Enter.

Step 4:
Take note of the percentage of replies you’re receiving.

Step 5:
If you receive Request time out, move the computer closer to the router until continuous replies will be received.

Windows 2000/XP

Step 1:
Click Start, then Run.

Step 2:
When the Run window opens, type “cmd” in the Open field, then click OK.

Step 3:
When the MS DOS Prompt appears, type “ping 192.168.1.1 –t” or the IP address of the wireless router then press Enter.

Step 5:
If you receive Request time out, move the computer closer to the router until continuous replies will be received.

Windows Vista

 Step 1:

Click the Pearl button  located on the bottom left corner of the screen and on the Start Search type “command prompt”, then press [Enter].

 

Step 2:
When the MS DOS Prompt appears, type “ping 192.168.1.1 –t” or the IP address of the wireless router then press Enter.

Step 3:
Take note of the percentage of replies you’re receiving.

Step 4:
If you receive Request time out, move the computer closer to the router until continuous replies will be received.

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